10 reasons to eat cashews

10 reasons to eat cashews

The cashew nut is a delicious nut that makes a great snack. It is also great in salads and Asian stir-fry dishes, and makes fantastic nut butter. Like most nuts, they are packed with healthy fats and health benefits. Let’s take a look at 10 reasons to eat cashews.

1. Bone health:
Cashews are rich in magnesium, which is essential for healthy bones. Most of the magnesium found in the human body is in the bones. The copper in cashews contributes to flexibility in bones and joints.

2. Controls blood pressure:
Cashews are an excellent source of magnesium. This potent mineral is believed to help lower blood pressure when it gets too high.

3. Good source of fiber:
Dietary fiber is key to proper digestive health and relieving constipation. It is also important for removing toxins from the body and increasing satiety from meals, so you eat less and lose weight.

4. Healthy fats:
Cashews have a lower fat content than most fats. What’s more is that most of the fats that they do contain are heart healthy monounsaturated fats. One of the healthiest fats in cashews is oleic acid, which is well known as an unsaturated fat in olive oil as well. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that when diabetics had monounsaturated fats like oleic acid added to their diet, their high triglyceride levels decreased. Triglycerides are fats in the blood that are considered a major risk factor for heart disease when levels get too high.

5. Heart health:
A study published by the British Journal of Nutrition identified several nuts including cashews among some of the highest total content of antioxidants. The study also shows that these antioxidants may be why nuts are so good for heart health.  Another study published in the British Journal of Nutrition showed that eating nuts lowered the risk of coronary heart disease.

6. May fight cancer:
Cashew nuts are full of proanthocyanidins, a type of antioxidant that is believed to starve tumors and stop cancer cells from spreading. The high levels of copper in cashews, which help eliminate free radicals that are a major risk factor for many types of cancers.

7. Prevent gallstones:
A 20-year Harvard study showed that women who ate at least 1 ounce of nuts per week had a 25% lower risk of developing gallstones. Simply grabbing a handful of cashews once a week or eating some cashew butter can help reap these benefits.

8. Rich in copper:
Cashews are a great source of copper, with 0.6 mg per ounce, which is 31% of the recommended daily value. Copper is an essential nutrient for developing bone and connective tissue, killing disease-causing free radicals, and helping the body utilize iron.

9. Rich in magnesium:
They are an excellent source of magnesium, providing 81.8 mg per ounce, which is 20% of the recommended daily value. It is essential for maintaining healthy bones, considering most of the magnesium found in our bodies is in the bones. Magnesium regulates calcium in our bodies, in turn regulating muscle tone. A deficiency of magnesium can cause muscle cramps, migraines, fatigue, soreness, and high blood pressure.

10. Weight loss:
People often stay away from nuts because of fear that they may cause weight gain. However, studies have shown that these fears do not have merit.

A study published in a journal called Obesity showed that those who ate nuts twice a week were 31% less likely to gain weight.

Note: None of the information in our website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. The content on our website is for educational purposes only.

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For the health benefits of cashews.
Health benefits of pistachios.
Health benefits of almonds.

REFERENCES:
1. “Effects of Medium-chain Fatty Acids and Oleic Acid on Blood Lipids, Lipoproteins, Glucose, Insulin, and Lipid Transfer Protein Activities.” AJCN.Nutrition.org. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, n.d. Web. 20 Jul. 2015.
2. “Nuts and Coronary Heart Disease: An Epidemiological Perspective.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 20 Jul. 2015.
3. “Health Benefits of Nuts: Potential Role of Antioxidants.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 20 Jul. 2015.
4. “Frequent Nut Consumption and Decreased Risk of Cholecystectomy in Women.” AJCN.Nutrition.org. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, n.d. Web. 20 Jul. 2015.
5. “Nut Consumption and Weight Gain in a Mediterranean Cohort: The SUN Study.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 20 Jul. 2015.
6. “Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Nuts, Cashew Nuts, Raw.” Self Nutrition Data. Self Nutrition Data, n.d. Web. 20 Jul. 2015.

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